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Whatever Book Club for Teens: Senior Center Book Group

Council on Aging Book Group

The Council on Aging Book Group meets at the Dedham Senior Center- 450 Washington Street in Dedham, MA at 1pm on the third Tuesday of every month. Copies of each book will be available no less than a month before each meeting and kept at the circulation desk for your convenience. Clicking on the book's title will bring you to our catalog where you may also place a hold on the item for pickup at your local library.

Each section on this page details the book we will be discussing that month, and gives possible discussion questions to guide your reading. Please feel free to reach out to Julie at jharvey@minlib.net with any questions or concerns. 

Enjoy!

November 19

Description:

Alice Wright marries handsome American Bennett Van Cleve hoping to escape her stifling life in England. But small-town Kentucky quickly proves equally claustrophobic, especially living alongside her overbearing father-in-law. So when a call goes out for a team of women to deliver books as part of Eleanor Roosevelt’s new traveling library, Alice signs on enthusiastically.

The leader, and soon Alice’s greatest ally, is Margery, a smart-talking, self-sufficient woman who’s never asked a man’s permission for anything. They will be joined by three other singular women who become known as the Packhorse Librarians of Kentucky.

What happens to them–and to the men they love–becomes an unforgettable drama of loyalty, justice, humanity and passion. These heroic women refuse to be cowed by men or by convention. And though they face all kinds of dangers in a landscape that is at times breathtakingly beautiful, at others brutal, they’re committed to their job: bringing books to people who have never had any, arming them with facts that will change their lives.

Based on a true story rooted in America’s past, The Giver of Stars is unparalleled in its scope and epic in its storytelling. Funny, heartbreaking, enthralling, it is destined to become a modern classic–a richly rewarding novel of women’s friendship, of true love, and of what happens when we reach beyond our grasp for the great beyond.

From. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/43925876-the-giver-of-stars?from_search=true&from_srp=true&qid=aJ5eX34d4U&rank=1

 

Discussion Questions:

  1. Let’s talk about why Alice married Bennett. What kind of life did she expect in America? And how did it compare to her reality?
  2. Life in rural Kentucky in the ’30s was definitely not for the faint of heart. How do you think you would have handled it if you were Alice? Would you have stayed or gone back to England?
  3. Did you know anything about the real life Packhorse Librarians of Kentucky prior to reading this novel?
  4. Why did Alice decide to join these librarians on their quest? Let’s talk about why it was so important for these librarians to share literacy with rural residents.
  5. Let’s talk about Margery! She’s tough as nails but definitely has a soft spot for the other librarians, especially for Alice. Let’s talk about how her background shaped who she became. Why was she so resistant on marrying Sven? How did she change from the beginning of the story and to the end?
  6. In the 1930s there was a power imbalance between men and women—with men viewing women as beneath them. Let’s talk about how the main characters all eventually rose above that and proved the men wrong.
  7. This is a lengthy novel so there’s plenty that goes on. What did you think about Margery’s war with Van Cleve and the subplot about the mines and the slurry dam? Were you engaged with that storyline? Why or why not?
  8. Let’s talk about Alice’s slow burn romance with Fred.
  9. Margery goes to jail for the murder of Clem McCullough. Were you surprised his daughter ended up helping Margery to get out of jail?
  10. What did you think about the ending for all the characters? Let’s talk about why rural Kentucky was the right place all along for Alice.
  11. What are the key themes and takeaways from this novel?
  12. Have you read any other novels by Jojo Moyes? How does this one compared to her other ones?

From https://bookclubchat.com/books/book-club-questions-for-the-giver-of-stars-by-jojo-moyes/

December 21

Book Description:

Set in the days of civilization's collapse, Station Eleven tells the story of a Hollywood star, his would-be savior, and a nomadic group of actors roaming the scattered outposts of the Great Lakes region, risking everything for art and humanity.

One snowy night a famous Hollywood actor slumps over and dies onstage during a production of King Lear. Hours later, the world as we know it begins to dissolve. Moving back and forth in time—from the actor's early days as a film star to fifteen years in the future, when a theater troupe known as the Traveling Symphony roams the wasteland of what remains—this suspenseful, elegiac, spellbinding novel charts the strange twists of fate that connect five people: the actor, the man who tried to save him, the actor's first wife, his oldest friend, and a young actress with the Traveling Symphony, caught in the crosshairs of a dangerous self-proclaimed prophet.

From https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/20170404-station-eleven?from_search=true&from_srp=true&qid=IJO8CmINpM&rank=1

 

Discussion Questions:

1. Now that you’ve read the entire novel, go back and reread the passage by Czeslaw Milosz that serves as an epigraph. What does it mean? Why did Mandel choose it to introduce Station Eleven?

2.  Does the novel have a main character? Who would you consider it to be?

3. Arthur Leander dies while performing King Lear, and the Traveling Symphony performs Shakespeare’s works. On page 57, Mandel writes, “Shakespeare was the third born to his parents, but the first to survive infancy. Four of his siblings died young. His son, Hamnet, died at eleven and left behind a twin. Plague closed the theaters again and again, death flickering over the landscape.” How do Shakespearean motifs coincide with those of Station Eleven, both the novel and the comic?

4. Arthur’s death happens to coincide with the arrival of the Georgia Flu. If Jeevan had been able to save him, it wouldn’t have prevented the apocalypse. But how might the trajectory of the novel been different?

5.  What is the metaphor of the Station Eleven comic books? How does the Undersea connect to the events of the novel?

6. “Survival is insufficient,” a line from Star Trek: Voyager, is the Traveling Symphony’s motto. What does it mean to them?

7. On page 62, the prophet discusses death: “I’m not speaking of the tedious variations on physical death. There’s the death of the body, and there’s the death of the soul. I saw my mother die twice.” Knowing who his mother was, what do you think he meant by that?

8. Certain items turn up again and again, for instance the comic books and the paperweight—things Arthur gave away before he died, because he didn’t want any more possessions. And Clark’s Museum of Civilization turns what we think of as mundane belongings into totems worthy of study. What point is Mandel making?

9. On a related note, some characters—like Clark—believe in preserving and teaching about the time before the flu. But in Kirsten’s interview with François Diallo, we learn that there are entire towns that prefer not to: “We went to a place once where the children didn’t know the world had ever been different . . . ” (page 115). What are the benefits of remembering, and of not remembering?

10. What do you think happened during the year Kirsten can’t remember?

11. In a letter to his childhood friend, Arthur writes that he’s been thinking about a quote from Yeats, “Love is like the lion’s tooth.” (page 158). What does this mean, and why is he thinking about it?

12. How does the impending publication of those letters affect Arthur?

13. On page 206, Arthur remembers Miranda saying “I regret nothing,” and uses that to deepen his understanding of Lear, “a man who regrets everything,” as well as his own life. How do his regrets fit into the larger scope of the novel? Other than Miranda, are there other characters that refuse to regret?

14. Throughout the novel, those who were alive during the time before the flu remember specific things about those days: the ease of electricity, the taste of an orange. In their place, what do you think you’d remember most?

15. What do you imagine the Traveling Symphony will find when they reach the brightly lit town to the south?

16. The novel ends with Clark, remembering the dinner party and imagining that somewhere in the world, ships are sailing. Why did Mandel choose to end the novel with him?

From http://knopfdoubleday.com/guide/9780385353304/station-eleven/